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The NEO-CRAFT Millenium

叶霖耘Lerra Ye 2016-09-09 09:09

Graphite World In A Pencil

Many artists have used pencils to create works, but here's an exception. Cindy Chinn, who creates artwork right on a pencil, carved out a vibrant world within 1/4 inch boundary. With the use of a special glass pencil holder which can enlarge the sight-trains can be seen running through the shafts and dolphins leaping out the splash on top... It seems very easy to create some ink flowers with a pen in her hands. Her recent sculpture works made the African elephant vividly standing out. Graphite mixed with the very detailed pattern of the 'earth', which creates a very 'African' vibe.


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The Primitive Calls

As an avant-garde craft artist being the first to work with bark fibres, Chen Shu Yan actually looks like a typical ordinary Taiwanese lady, but with a deliberate look on her face.

She said," In comparison with myself painting with fine brushes a decade ago, I prefer creations involving more body work in the process so that I can feel the texture, the trait, the breathing of materials while I transform them." So twigs and trunks almost the same size as men are frequently seen on her motorcycle. And she fitted in well at the Hualien Kavalan tribe and live along with aboriginals so that she could have access to the first-hand info of weaving barks into cloth. She even intends to restore this lost art. In an era when synthetic materials are most popular, the outcome of her efforts comes to be notably conspicuous. Shuyan Chen though not a craftsman in the rst place, she chose to pursue art through threads and strings.


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Ceramic Beyond Wares

Pottery originated from China, but exclusive cultural characteristics turned up through a century-long worldwide diffusion. The Chinese tend to see ceramics as "useful" potteries, but Japanese ceramist, Sueharu Fukami goes the oppostie way. Born into a Kyoto's ceramist family and being a skilled craftsman himself, he masters wheel-throwing skill and high-pressure slipcasting technique to an impeccabe state. But he makes pottery only to convey a sort of sense. Albeit without ornamental elements, yet his pieces are reminiscnet of knives, waves, cliffs, lotus leaves etc. from Japanese culture. Since no trace of signatures nor ngerprints are left on the glaze, the integrality of the ceramic's appearance is immaculately preserved, presenting outlining features of blades, water or others. In a beauty of traquility remains a forceful dynamic tension, which leave us an obscure conjecture - perhaps the real beauty lies precisely beyond the functionalism.


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A Dream Weaver

From primitive to modern society, as one of the oldest human crafts, the function and status of woven handicrafts are also evolving without our knowing. Mass machinery production ltered out the rigid demands of daily life. Weaving craft constantly strives for excellence. Being of Greek and Turkish decent, she learned traditional hand weaving from her family carpet business. But she graduated from an art school in Argentina and brought the emulational moss, grass, bushes, water onto Dries Van Noten's runway on Paris Fashion Week-with every stitch. Four parts were assembled to form a stereoscopic and delicate 48-metre-long wool blanket which was inspired by her fantasy of Shakespeare's 'A Midsummer Night's Dream'. Alexandra says that sheep eat grass to produce wool and the wool yarn is woven back to the 'grass'. In brief, 'life is a cycle'.


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A Fair Funeral

Christopher Marley, a specimen artist in Oregon, USA, started out working with insects out of a lifelong phobia of them. "Once I looked at them from the perspective of a designer, delving a bit deeper into the insect world, I was shocked to discover how much latent elegance and lustrous beauty I had been unable to see." It was like discovering the secret aesthetic code of nature, Marley began to combine colour and texture of the living and non-living to form an almost irresistible palette. Insects, butter ies, birds, snakes... he retains the amazing beauty of these creatures with his exquisite skills. Shells, minerals, crystal, and feathers are also his materials. For Christopher Marley, if the dead and deserted can be treated tenderly and appreciated for long, we are truly listening to the nature's whisper in awe.


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